Posts Tagged ‘management’

20 questions on cyber-supply chain risk management

I recently wrote an article for Banking Technology that has been generally well received, I’ve decided to include it here on the blog for future reference. I’ve enjoyed working with Banking Technology and thoroughly recommend the editor David Bannister who has clearly been around the block enough times and has a wealth of experience in the field.

Managing cyber supply chain risk is an unsolved problem that has increasingly drawn my attention as I discover new risks and new failures of risk management in this area. The OECD found that 73% of services traded in OECD countries are ‘intermediate’ services or services that are intermediate inputs into a final service or product that is consumed. That statistic lies behind some of my concerns regarding aggregation and correlation of risk within and between different sector supply chains that are not immediately obvious.

This also highlights the complexity of supply chains in the modern economy. I believe that supply chain cyber security in the age of industrialised and targeted cyber-attacks is a wicked problem [PDF] and that many of our current approaches to manage these risks do not address the nature of the underlying risks and instead focus on a fairly superficial view of the technological controls operated by ‘key’ suppliers. There are more innovative approaches being developed such as Red teaming suppliers or actively monitoring supplier cyber hygiene but I am not seeing these regularly being built into coherent cyber supply chain risk management strategies yet. I hope the high level article below goes some way to encouraging this.

The original text is presented below and was published here.
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We need to talk about IT

It has long been a truism of security practitioners that security is not an IT problem. This is an attempt to lift the gaze of the security team from technology to the wider business. A laudable and useful goal. However, IT is a security problem.
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Misinterpreted policy?

A couple of months ago I was home ill from work and frankly a little bored.

While idly reading my twitter feed I reflected on a challenge I had been facing at work; a very technology-focused, agile, team that seemed to move faster than the security team could handle. I had some time ago realised that short of a herculean hiring effort we needed a combination of automation, delegation and good engagement to achieve the security outcomes we desired.

At about the same time as addressing that challenge I had also been involved in the production of updated acceptable use policy to meet some PCI DSS requirements which had been a lightly bruising affair. The business is a startup culture where freedom and good sense are valued much more highly than rules. The noticeably positive culture of the organisation was rooted in this and as a result the managers resisted the imposition of new rules. It was also the case that the staff cried out for information and knowledge so they could make their own minds up about security, they wanted security awareness training as long as it explained why security mattered and how it worked.

The combination of a fast moving technology team, the startup culture and the positive results of just good security communications and engagement was that a written policy seemed anachronistic and almost fossilised.

I posted the following provocative, somewhat tongue in cheek, but honest question:

Questioning security policies
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Follow the Money

When we talk about security with the business we need to talk about money.

I have occasionally run into colleagues whose answer to risk-based governance approaches and performance-based management approaches has been to say “Show me the money!”. I understood their desire to see security operate in the language of business but was always reticent to jump feet first into financially-driven security for a couple of reasons; firstly  I just couldn’t see how we could put a reliable value on what we did and secondly I was nervous about what that might expose. In hindsight I find myself increasingly becoming a financial fundamentalist for security.

Business is fundamentally the generation of profits to maximise the returns of investors. It is the result of one equation:

Profit = Revenue – Costs

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Cyber Exercising

Cyber Exercises are a powerful and valuable tool but it is easy to confuse what we mean.

I was a member of the Scenario Design Group for the Bank of England’s Waking Shark 2 cyber exercise this year. It was a fascinating experience, seeing how the top cyber/technology risk people at the banks view a massive cyber attack, what really concerns them as well as seeing the regulators and other government agencies engaging with industry.

Waking Shark 2 garnered a lot of headlines but little of real meat made it to the public domain. I signed up to the participants non-disclosure agreement so I won’t be  adding any details here. There will be a publicly published report from the Bank of England for that soon enough.

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