The security opportunity in Digital

Four years ago I discussed some of the characteristics of cyber security that made the use of the term useful, this was at a time when the use of cyber security was widely derided by practitioners of IT security and Information Security. One of the common complaints was that Cyber was just the same things we had already been doing re-branded to seem ‘cool’. As time has moved on the practices of cyber have become clearer, the use of threat intelligence, the development of threat hunting, the increased focused on incident response, the wide deployment of behavioural analytics etc. As is the case early adopters knew they were solving new problems in a new way but the articulation of meaning to the later adopters has needed a body of activity and emerging practices to clarify how cyber security overlaps with but also differs from the other predecessor disciplines IT and Information Security (both of which are still going strong and are still necesary).

Another buzzword appeared soon after cyber and that was Digital. Digital is a customer-focused technology-first approach to business that again looked just like what we were doing before in technology and business activities. Over time practices have emerged, agile development, devops, infrastructure automation, cloud, mobile, social etc that have started defining what the early adopters really meant when they said Digital.

Digital lies in the intersection of velocity, scale and complexity.

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Cyber Resilience: Part Six Recommended Reading

 

Here are the sources used when developing the thinking behind this blog series:

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Cyber Resilience: Part Five What next?

Cyber resistance clearly requires leadership and operational intervention from specialised cyber professionals.  However, Cyber Resilience requires a broader institutional response that encompasses all aspects of the business.  As such, it needs to be owned by the entire executive management of an organisation.

The Department encourages all institutions to view cyber security as an integral aspect of their overall risk management strategy, rather than solely as a subset of information technology.” Benjamin Lawsky, Superintendent of Financial Services, New York State Department of Financial Services, December 2014

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Cyber Resilience: Part Four Companies’ Plans Must Include Both Resistance and Resilience

Resistance to cyber attack is undoubtedly valuable and can produce effective outcomes. However, resistance is expensive and there is a law of diminishing returns on the investments made in resistance, Moreover, because the preparations and mitigations employed in resisting attacks are often specific to particular, point-in-time threats, ongoing resistance is both complex and fragile — unexpected shifts in attacker tactics can bypass existing defences and leave organisations struggling to deploy new controls at an appropriate pace. Faced with the total capabilities of nation-state attackers or state-sponsored cybercriminals, many organisations are unable to deploy effective controls quickly enough or spend enough money to completely mitigate the totality of the threats they face.

“Financial firms should assume they will be subject to destructive attacks and develop capabilities and procedures to resume operations. Financial firms also need to be ready to quickly restore computer networks and technology-enabled operations in response to known or unforeseen threats that could cause catastrophic disruption.” Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC) 2015 Annual Report

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Cyber Resilience: Part Three What is Cyber Resilience?

Cyber Resilience is an organisation’s preparation for business disruption caused by cyber attacks; its ability to recover from these disruptions; and its systemic capability to adapt and grow from each attack it experiences.

Cyber resilience requires that, while organisations strive to prevent incidents, they also understand their internal operating environments and digital ecosystems well enough to develop and deploy processes that:

  1. Accelerate the detection of successful attacks; and
  2. Contain and respond to identified attacks.

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